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  • Lee Burton Answers Common Questions About Chops and Lifts

    Joe Heiler of SportsRehabExpert.com interviews Lee Burton, co-founder of FMS and discusses his background, where the FMS fits in sports and rehabilitation, and two fundamental exercises: chops and lifts.

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  • Organic Exercise?

    Organic Exercise?

    9 months ago, in FMS Philosophy by Gray Cook

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    The book In Defense of Food by Michael Pollan presents a well-researched and compelling story that explains how we have undermined our nutrition in an attempt to save time and money. Ironically, the story also parallels our attempts at exercise and activity: We have regrettably used reductionist science to try to improve movement.

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  • Stanford’s Distinct Training Regimen Redefines Strength

    The Stanford football team just made a fourth straight BCS bowl appearance. Find out what makes their strength and conditioning program unique, and how their approach incorporates FMS.

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    FMS Football Flexibility

  • Western Movement

    Western Movement

    9 months ago, in FMS Philosophy by Gray Cook

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    The effect of a western lifestyle goes beyond the oft-discussed western-type diet. New western-type movement patterns indicate an erosion of fundamental movement patterns once reinforced by the natural limitations facing our ancestors.

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  • The Importance of Primitive Patterns

    Lee and Gray discuss why it is important to understand primitive patterns and how they can be utilized in your assessments and training.

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  • FMS Featured on BT Winnipeg

    Elite Sports Injury Physiotherapists recently joined the BT Winnipeg show to talk about how their organization seeks to prevent athlete injuries by using FMS as their primary tool for risk assessment.

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    Injury Assessment

  • Movement Principle # 10

    Movement Principle # 10

    10 months ago, in FMS Philosophy by Gray Cook

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    Gray further develops the tenth of the 10 Movement Principles he presented in Chapter 15 of his book, Movement. Principle # 10 states: The routine practice of self-limiting exercises can maintain the quality of our movement perceptions and behaviors and preserve our unique adaptability that modern conveniences erode.

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  • Movement Principle # 9

    Movement Principle # 9

    10 months ago, in FMS Philosophy by Gray Cook

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    Gray further develops the ninth of the 10 Movement Principles he presented in Chapter 15 of his book, Movement. Principle # 9 states: Our corrective exercise dosage recipe suggests that we work close to the baseline at the edge of ability with a clear goal. This should produce a rich sensory experience filled with manageable mistakes.

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  • Movement Principle # 8

    Movement Principle # 8

    10 months ago, in FMS Philosophy by Gray Cook

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    Gray further develops the eighth of the 10 Movement Principles he presented in Chapter 15 of his book, Movement. Principle # 8 states: We must develop performance and skill considering each tier in a natural progression of movement development and specialization. This is the pyramid model of the competency, capacity and specialization part.

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  • Movement Principle # 7

    Movement Principle # 7

    10 months ago, in FMS Philosophy by Gray Cook

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    Gray further develops the seventh of the 10 Movement Principles he presented in Chapter 15 of his book, Movement. Principle # 7 states: We should not put fitness on movement dysfunction.

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    Fitness Dysfunction

  • Movement Principle # 6

    Movement Principle # 6

    10 months ago, in FMS Philosophy by Gray Cook

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    Gray further develops the sixth of the 10 Movement Principles he presented in Chapter 15 of his book, Movement. Principle # 6 states: Perception drives movement behavior and movement behavior modulates perception.

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  • Movement Principle # 5

    Movement Principle # 5

    10 months ago, in FMS Philosophy by Gray Cook

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    Gray further develops the fifth of the 10 Movement Principles he presented in Chapter 15 of his book, Movement. Principle # 5 states: Corrective exercise should not be a rehearsal of outputs. Instead, it should represent challenging opportunities to manage mistakes on a functional level near the edge of ability.

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  • Movement Principle # 4

    Movement Principle # 4

    10 months ago, in FMS Philosophy by Gray Cook

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    Gray further develops the fourth of the 10 Movement Principles he presented in Chapter 15 of his book, Movement. Principle # 4 states: Movement learning and re-learning has hierarchies that are fundamental to the development of perception and behavior.

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  • Movement Principle # 3

    Movement Principle # 3

    10 months ago, in FMS Philosophy by Gray Cook

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    Gray further develops the third of the 10 Movement Principles he presented in Chapter 15 of his book, Movement. Principle # 3 states: Biomechanical and physiological evaluation does not provide a complete risk screening or diagnostic assessment tool for a comprehensive understanding of movement pattern behaviors.

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  • Movement Principle # 2

    Movement Principle # 2

    10 months ago, in FMS Philosophy by Gray Cook

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    Gray further develops the second of the 10 Movement Principles he presented in Chapter 15 of his book, Movement. Principle # 2 states: The starting point for movement learning is a reproducible movement baseline.

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  • Movement Principle # 1

    Movement Principle # 1

    11 months ago, in FMS Philosophy by Gray Cook

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    Gray further develops the first of the 10 Movement Principles he presented in Chapter 15 of his book, Movement. Principle # 1 states: Separate painful movement patterns from dysfunctional movement patterns whenever possible to create clarity and perspective.

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  • Isolation vs. Movement Patterns

    Isolation vs. Movement Patterns

    11 months ago, in FMS Philosophy by Gray Cook

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    Gray discusses the assumptions individuals often make when training, especially when choosing isolation over movement patterns.

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  • Testing the Ankle to Prevent Reinjury

    Dr. Butler, of Duke University, discusses adding an Ankle Clearing Test to those already in place as part of the FMS. He explains why the ankle joint is extremely important, how to properly test ankle range of motion, and what current FMS tests challenge ankle dorsiflexion.

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    Injury

  • Why Am I Injured?

    Why Am I Injured?

    11 months ago, in FMS Screening by Brandon Bennett

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    How a test (FMS) can tell you what to work on to keep you on the mats, or just help you stay active.

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  • The Future of Exercise Program Design

    I'm a stickler for collecting information and applying it to program design. Let me tell you a little more of how I think about it.

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