Tall Kneeling Turns Posterior Load

This self-limiting exercise helps to expose a lack of motor control and bilateral asymmetries in the Tall Kneeling position.

Being in the Tall kneeling posture by placing both knees on the ground just wider than your hips, your lower legs remain parallel, and your ankles are plantar flexed.  Your pelvis remains in a neutral stacked position with a tall spine, and your shoulder and hips remain squared off.      
                                                       
Begin by holding a kettlebell or sandbag in both hands behind of you.  Be sure to maintain the balanced upright posture and perform a series of turns:
 
1) Head Turns 
Turn the head to the right and left in a smooth, controlled manner maintaining the “perfect posture” and take a deep diaphragmatic breath and return to a neutral position.  Begin with small turns and slowly add range but do not push into discomfort or increase the range, so you have to compensate in any way.
 
2) Head and Shoulder Turns with stationary KB 
Turn the head and shoulders to the right and left in a smooth and controlled manner maintaining the “perfect posture” and leaving the KB in front of the body.  Begin with small turns and slowly add range but do not push into discomfort or increase the range, so you have to compensate in any way.  Pause at the end ranges to cycle a full breath.
 
3) Head and Shoulder Turns with moving KB 
Turn the head and shoulders to the right and left in a smooth and controlled manner while moving the KB in that direction. (if you can turn far enough you may move the KB to the outside of the hip you are turning over). The aim is to perform this turns while maintaining "perfect posture"  Begin with small turns and slowly add range but do not push into discomfort or increase the range, so you have to compensate in any way.
 
Pause at the end ranges to cycle a full breath.
 

Related Exercises

  • Get-up to Tall Sit

    This exercise improves the transition to the tall sit position of the Get-up.

  • Rolling Lower Body

    This is a lower body rolling pattern used to increase the dynamic stability and core communication connecting the upper and lower body in a natural rotational pattern. Segmental lower body rolling looks at a primitive stabilization strategy in young children to adults.

  • Dorsiflexion Resisted Ball Roll with Core Activation with FMT

    This exercise helps develop dorsiflexion throughout a full range of hip, knee and ankle mobility.

  • Chop from Half Kneeling with Cable Bar

    This is a diagonal pattern that helps develop trunk and lower body stability and upper body strength.